Published on September 22, 2017

Concerns About Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)

Child with ADHDAttention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder that can begin in childhood and carry on into adulthood. All children will go through times where they have trouble focusing and behaving, but children with ADHD will continually have trouble paying attention, controlling impulsive behaviors (may act without thinking about what the result will be), or be overly active. This is a condition that tends to run in families and affects more boys than girls. Children with ADHD can fall into a few groups:

  • Predominantly Inattentive - It is hard for the individual to organize or finish a task, to pay attention to details, or to follow instructions or conversations.
  • Predominantly Hyperactive-Impulsive - The person fidgets and talks a lot. It is hard to sit still for long (e.g., for a meal or while doing homework). Someone who is impulsive may interrupt others a lot, grab things from people, or speak at inappropriate times. It is hard for the person to wait their turn or listen to directions.
  • Combined Presentation: Symptoms of the above two types are equally present in the person.

An accurate diagnosis and assessment of the severity of ADHD in children is critical to provide the best possible treatment, as well as help them adjust to school, extra-curricular activity and social settings.

Dr. William Hickling, a pediatric neurologist at Cone Health Child Neurology, spoke of Fox 8 House Call about how ADHD is diagnosed and how to help children with ADHD be successful.